SAS Student Ambassadors

The SAS Student Ambassador would be a part of our new professional development and outreach programs. This position will provide invaluable opportunities for students to learn how to take initiatives for advancing our profession through collaboration with other students and senior scholars. If you are interested, please send a brief statement about your interests and how you would like to get involved in our outreach programs and/or other activities, along with a CV, to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Introducing the SAS Student Ambassador Program

Program Description
The Society for Archaeological Sciences (SAS) wants to help create the next generation of leadership in archaeological sciences by selection of SAS Student Ambassadors. The SAS Student Ambassador would be a part of our new professional development and outreach programs. This position will provide invaluable opportunities for students to learn how to take initiatives for advancing our profession through collaboration with other students and senior scholars. SAS Board members will support student-led activities with varying capacities.

Eligibility
Any student members of SAS, including undergraduate and graduate students in any country.

Activities
You can propose any activities that help to advance and promote archaeological sciences, including, but not limited to:
• Organize regional conferences and workshops
• Organize symposia and forums at international conferences, such as the SAAs
• Participate in membership recruitment initiatives
• Assist in developing bulletins and social media
Board members will assist your proposed activities in various aspects, including funding.

Terms
One-year term, but renewable contingent upon the decision of the Executive Board.

How to apply
Send a brief statement about your interests and how you would like to get involved in our outreach programs and/or other activities, along with a CV, to Tatsuya Murakami (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). Applications are accepted any time of the year.

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Jayde Hirniak

Jayde Hirniak, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, 900 Cady Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281

Jayde Hirniak is a PhD student in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. Her research interests include modern human origins, timing and impact of volcanic eruptions, archaeological site formation processes, and advancing field survey methods. She has worked on various archaeological projects in Italy, South Africa, Greece and Kenya. Her current work focuses on using cryptotephra, microscopic glass shards from a volcanic eruption, to better date and correlate archaeological sites in northern Italy and South Africa.

 

Rachel L. Johnson

Rachel L. Johnson, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., Dinwiddie Hall 105, New Orleans, LA 70118; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Rachel Lee Johnson is an 4th year archaeology PhD student at Tulane University and a 2016 recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF-GRFP). Prior to coming to Tulane, Johnson earned a B.A. in anthropology and a B.S. in geology from the University of Pittsburgh (2016). Her dissertation research seeks to evaluate the economic and social relationships between the Andean highlands and the Upper Amazon during the Initial Period (1700-800 BCE) and Early Horizon (800-300 BCE) through the reconstruction of trade networks via material sourcing and the application of archaeometric techniques, like ceramic petrography, portable x-ray fluorescence (pXRF), and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). At a broader level, she is interested in questions surrounding the development of social complexity and in the social and economic processes relating to craft production, trade, and material consumption.

Emily J. Kate

Emily J. Kate, Department of Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University, 410 Carpenter Building, University Park, PA 16802; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Emily J. Kate is Ph.D. candidate in The Pennsylvania State University Department of Anthropology. Her dissertation investigates the impact of migration on the socio-political landscape of the Central Highlands of Mesoamerica during the Epiclassic period (~AD 550-900). Broadly, she specializes in bioarchaeology, isotopic reconstructions of paleodiet and ancient migration patterns, paleodemography, and radiometric chronology building.